Thursday, April 20, 2017

Baldwin Park Fires Newest Chief of Police, David Salcedo

Fired Baldwin Park Chief of Police,
David Salcedo
After working approximately a month for the City of Baldwin Park, Council Members Ricardo Pacheco, Susan Rubio, and Cruz Baca voted to fire the former Inglewood Captain, David Salcedo. In response, Mayor Manuel Lozano and Monica Garcia ranted about what a great chief he was at the council meeting and then left the meeting.

Members of the community were concerned with Salcedo's lack of experience and his corrupt reputation. (Apparently, he bungled the investigation of a young girl who died at the Los Angeles Coliseum.) In his first month of office, Salcedo was seen meeting and greeting people at church and rarely seen in his office.

Salcedo's appointment has been a controversial one. Manuel Lozano stated that he should get paid the same as "the White Boy," referring to the former Chief: Michael Taylor.

In less than a five year period, Baldwin Park has fired (or forced into resignation) three chiefs of police, one city attorney, one finance director, one community works director, and one public works director. In fact, the only person in the executive team that's stayed is Parks and Recreation Director: Manuel Carrillo Jr also known as Manuel Carrillo.

I'll write more later. I've had a lot of work on lately, including a petition for review to the Supreme Court.

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Court of Appeals Rules Against Casas - Holding that City Doesn't Need to Tell us the Truth

Moses and Aaron meet Pharaoh and Aaron turns his rod into a snake.
by Robert Leinweber. January 01, 1850
Last week, the Court of Appeal of the Second District ruled against Julian Casas, holding that the trial court was correct in ruling that the City complied with court order to release records, even when the City made misrepresentations to the court and us, that they didn't have any records (when in fact, Casas proved that they were lying about it all). In other words, Casas was trying to get the rest of the records from the City, but the courts have said that the City doesn't need to release the outstanding records, which would show who took millions of dollars from the towing scandal Mayor Lozano and his men were running.

The main reason the court said that Casas didn't have a case against the City was because Casas didn't present evidence that the City had evidence (but he did). That was the whole point of the case: After a court order issues, does the requester of records have to prove that the City has records, or does the City have to assist the requestor about whether records exist?

Here, the court said, once again, that the requester has to prove that such records exist. (Think about this, if we could prove all the records the City had, why would we need to sue them for records in the first place?)

In any event, of course I was disappointed in the court's decision. But it doesn't mean the conversation between us and the courts are over yet; so, don't lose hope.

According to the Book of Exodus in the Torah, ages ago, a slave and a shepherd (the lowest of the low in Egyptian society) dialogued with the King, known as Pharaoh, and asked him to release God's people from slavery. The back-and-forth conversation included cruelty, miracles, magic, and a contest between holy and evil powers.

Like Casas's case, the whole conflict started with something small. In Julian's case, we just asked the City to extend the boxing club hours, and they said no. In Exodus, Moses asked Pharaoh if the people could have a party, celebrating their God for just three days. (So for those of you who think religion is all about being dull and not having fun, think about the fact that God commanded his people to throw a Burning-Man kind of party in the desert for three days.)

The dialogue ends with Pharaoh releasing the Hebrew people and giving them the Kingdom's wealth for their departure. Pharaoh, a king and a god in his sight, also had to finally ask the slave and the shepherd to bless him and his people.

What's the point of the allegory? To point out, I have no idea what's going to happen next. I only hope it's exciting, because I certainly don't want to be bored.

I also hope that those in power will return to the ancient ways of their ancestors, have faith, and live a life reflected in nobility and honor.

Monday, April 3, 2017

Reading Recommendations and Being Back Home

Well, I'm back home from Jamaica now. While away, I was able to get some reading done; hence, I have book recommendations for everyone.

Also, I brought just the right amount of stuff on my travels. A skilled traveler brings only enough, and not more. On this trip, I only brought a few more pieces of clothing than I needed and two extra books. That's pretty good, I thought, as I analyzed my suitcase's content after coming home.

While I came home, my kitty Jeh Pan laid down on the wall, looking like an Egyptian Sphinx watching the house, as a sentry watches a wall. I called to him, and he came down.

My mom commented I blackened so much that I'm not recognizable as Paul. She scolded me for not wearing sunblock. I just scratched the back of my head and smiled, embarrassed.

She continued, "You're so black, people won't think you came back from a holiday. They'll think you were born that way."

Coincidentally, at home, I brewed myself a cup of Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee. I felt tired from not sleeping enough. I didn't feel rested enough and thought, I should go away again soon.

Here's my book recommendations and main insight, in any event.

Lincoln and His Generals by T. Harry Williams. Every strategists need to read this book. Williams gets into the head of Lincoln and his main generals and shows you the war from their perspective by analyzing the letters written and battles fought. Although at times, the book gets too technical and dull, it really proves the brilliance of Lincoln and Grant and the creation of modern military communication. Highly recommended.

Art of War by Sun Tzu. Again, every strategists needs to know the simple Chinese treatise on war. Some of the principles are so basic, but basic also means fundamental. In reviewing the Art of War, I realize that I strayed from some basic principles too. It's probably a text that needs to be constantly reviewed, because some of the principles become clearer only after a defeat or a mistake made. For instance, one principle says that when five types of spies are in play, a General is invincible. Now that, I don't remember from reading it the first time. So, this one comes recommended too.

Kids for Cash by William Ecenbarger. This American expose reveals how judges were sending children to detention camps and prison for the slightest offenses, such as swearing, because those same judges were receiving big kickbacks. It's a great reminder to not trust government, who in this case was tied to the mafia. This book proves there's no limit to the evils of government, when profit is involved.

The Obesity Code by Jason Fong. Fong argues that fat is not about "calories in" versus "calories out"; rather, gaining fat is a much more complex phenomenon that is due mainly to the consumption of sugar and simple carbohydrates. He also provides a simple and effective solution to maintaining weight loss. The book is also clearly written. By no means am I obese, but every fighter needs these types of books to remind them of the importance of their own nutrition, which affects the health of their mind and body.

Main Insight Learned in Jamaica: “Mammon is still the god of the world's largest and most powerful religion.” - Marty Rubin.